The Week in Review: Britain’s New Prime Minister

Jessica Elsey / July 15, 2016

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 13: New Prime Minister Theresa May, followed by her husband Philip John, is welcomed by staff as she walks into 10 Downing Street after meeting Queen Elizabeth II and accepting her invitation to become Prime Minister and form a new government on July 13, 2016 in London, United Kingdom. Former Home Secretary Theresa May becomes the UK's second female Prime Minister after she was selected unopposed by Conservative MPs to be their new party leader. She is currently MP for Maidenhead. (Photo by Stefan Rousseau - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

New Prime Minister Theresa May, followed by her husband Philip John, is welcomed by staff as she walks into 10 Downing Street on July 13, 2016 in London, United Kingdom. Photo by Stefan Rousseau – WPA Pool/Getty Images

Britain got a new prime minister this week as Theresa May entered the door of 10 Downing Street Wednesday, becoming the second female head of government in the country’s history.

Previous leader David Cameron stepped down following the nation’s Brexit fallout. It was initially thought he would leave his post in September while the Conservative Party spent time deciding on a replacement. But May quickly became the only viable candidate after a hectic couple of weeks when numerous party members jumped in and out of the race.

May originally vied for the role alongside Michael Gove, Andrea Leadsom, Stephen Crabb and Liam Fox. Ex-London Mayor Boris Johnson announced he would not be running. Grove later bowed out due to little support and Leadsom because of a controversial quote.

This left May as the last remaining candidate, and she was officially announced as new leader by the Conservative Party.

Britain got a new prime minister this week as Theresa May entered the door of 10 Downing Street Wednesday, becoming the second female head of government in the country’s history.

Previous leader David Cameron stepped down following the nation’s Brexit fallout. It was initially thought he would leave his post in September while the Conservative Party spent time deciding on a replacement. But May quickly became the only viable candidate after a hectic couple of weeks when numerous party members jumped in and out of the race.

May originally vied for the role alongside Michael Gove, Andrea Leadsom, Stephen Crabb and Liam Fox. Ex-London Mayor Boris Johnson announced he would not be running. Grove later bowed out due to little support and Leadsom because of a controversial quote.

This left May as the last remaining candidate, and she was officially announced as new leader by the Conservative Party.

Britain got a new prime minister this week as Theresa May entered the door of 10 Downing Street Wednesday, becoming the second female head of government in the country’s history.

Previous leader David Cameron stepped down following the nation’s Brexit fallout. It was initially thought he would leave his post in September while the Conservative Party spent time deciding on a replacement. But May quickly became the only viable candidate after a hectic couple of weeks when numerous party members jumped in and out of the race.

May originally vied for the role alongside Michael Gove, Andrea Leadsom, Stephen Crabb and Liam Fox. Ex-London Mayor Boris Johnson announced he would not be running. Grove later bowed out due to little support and Leadsom because of a controversial quote.

This left May as the last remaining candidate, and she was officially announced as new leader by the Conservative Party.

Queen Elizabeth II welcomes Theresa May, left, at the start of an audience in Buckingham Palace, London, where she invited the former Home Secretary to become Prime Minister and form a new government, Wednesday July 13, 2016. David Cameron had resigned the post in an earlier meeting with the queen. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP)

Queen Elizabeth II welcomes Theresa May, left, at the start of an audience in Buckingham Palace, London, Wednesday July 13, 2016. Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP

In order to assume her new position, May had to follow British custom and meet with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday. As per tradition, the Queen then invited May to form a new government.

Earlier in the day Cameron also visited the Queen, formally telling her majesty that he planned to resign. Prior to their meeting he hosted his final Prime Minister’s Questions during his last day in office, before leaving Parliament to a standing ovation from Conservative Party members.

May’s leadership begins with the challenge of taking the UK through Brexit, the nation’s complicated exit from the European Union. In her opening speech, she told the British public of her plan to “build a better Britain.”

“The Government I lead will be driven, not by the interests of the privileged few but by yours. We will do everything we can to give you more control over your lives,” she said. “When we take the big calls we will think not of the powerful, but you. When we pass new laws we will listen not to the mighty, but to you.”

Follow the latest updates on UK political changes via these Flipboard topics and magazines.

Theresa May: All the stories on Britain’s PM as she begins her new position

David Cameron: Insight into how Cameron will now spend his days

Boris Johnson: Read up on how the world reacted to Johnson’s new foreign secretary role

UK Leadership Changes by Flipboard UK: News on every angle of the changes, hand curated by the Flipboard UK Newsteam

UK Politics by Cornucopia: Analysis and opinion on May’s Brexit challenge

Positive Politics by Peter Bray: Who’s who in May’s new cabinet? Find out here

~JessE is reading Life On The Other Side